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Book As Art v. 9: Muse

Artist books take many forms – from handmade and lusciously tactile to linear and informative, abstract and questioning to sculptural and monumental.

The Decatur Arts Alliance presents the ninth edition of the juried exhibition of artists’ books, The Book as Art v.9: Muse, August 13–October 3, 2021. This show celebrates the book with a wildly varied collection of inventive and spectacular work that challenges expectations. The exhibition will be installed once again at the Decatur Branch of the DeKalb County Public Library.

Brought to you by Decatur Arts Alliance, Georgia Center for the Book, the DeKalb Co. Public Library, DeKalb Library Foundation and Keep it Indie-catur.

Opening Reception

Friday, Aug. 27 • 7-9 pm • Free
Outside the Decatur Library, 215 Sycamore St.,Decatur, Ga.

The opening reception will have a limited capacity with registration required.  Check back here to register for the event soon.

Register Here

Gallery Hours

Aug. 13-Oct.3
The Periodicals Gallery of the Decatur Library, 215 Sycamore St.,Decatur, Ga

Open daily 2-6 p.m. by appointment. Registration required. Check back here to book an appointment soon.

Book An Appointment

About Volume 9: Muse

Nine: a number both sacred and profane. This mystical numeral, both spiritual and scientific, is celebrated the world over, and in all religions, representing the brightest and darkest aspects of the celestial and the terrestrial.

For the Ancient Greeks, nine sisters born of heaven and memory gave inspiration to artists, scientists , and historians. They guided the feet and the fingers, moved the brush and the pen, swelled the chest, and sweetened the voice.

The muses still call out to artists world-wide, placing in their minds the seeds of creation. Words, phrases, and forms are born and transformed upon the page. Held in the hand, a book can be a source of stability in unsettled times.. From tablet to folio, papyrus to scroll, song to psalm—all are created as a concept that becomes thought, becomes word, becomes book, becomes sculpture.

The objects in this exhibition will interpret the concept of the book and invite the viewer to look beyond the printed page to where ideas, words, and symbols are transformed and are transfigured. They are expressive, iconic, mystical, and inspirational. They are, in form, muse.

For the Ancient Greeks, nine sisters born of heaven and memory gave inspiration to artists, scientists , and historians. They guided the feet and the fingers, moved the brush and the pen, swelled the chest, and sweetened the voice.

The muses still call out to artists world-wide, placing in their minds the seeds of creation. Words, phrases, and forms are born and transformed upon the page. Held in the hand, a book can be a source of stability in unsettled times.. From tablet to folio, papyrus to scroll, song to psalm—all are created as a concept that becomes thought, becomes word, becomes book, becomes sculpture.

The objects in this exhibition will interpret the concept of the book and invite the viewer to look beyond the printed page to where ideas, words, and symbols are transformed and are transfigured. They are expressive, iconic, mystical, and inspirational. They are, in form, muse.

The 2021 Exhibition

Explore the 52 artist books that are a part of this year’s exhibition: Book As Art, v.9: Muse.
Click on the images for more details of each artwork.

“te tau iwa-circle of nine” by Marama Warren

“te tau iwa-circle of nine” by Marama Warren

Digital prints on handmade and recycled papers including from old photo albums. Linen thread, brass screw.

25.5cm x 25.5cm x.25cm (closed); 50cm wide x 25cm tall (open)

These nine Maori women were photographed in the late 1800’s by Elizabeth Pulman, New Zealand’s first known woman photographer.

The English-born mother of nine ran a photographic studio in Auckland and was respected by the local tribes. Her photos show Maori people from all walks of life. An album of her glass plate prints, treasured by my family for generations, is now in the Auckland Museum. Inspired by the words of Jean Shinoda Bolen, I have arranged photos of nine Maori portraits in a ‘creative circle’. My intention in making this book is to acknowledge these women, to bring them out of that musty album and give them a place in the world and the light.

Elizabeth Pulman (1836-1900) was born in England and sailed for New Zealand in 1861. Twice widowed, she raised nine children on her own and campaigned vigorously for copyright protection for map makers and photographers. Records show she held a deep respect for the Maori people and their culture.

Marama Warren, MIlton, Australia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“te tau iwa-circle of nine” by Marama Warren

Digital prints on handmade and recycled papers including from old photo albums. Linen thread, brass screw.

25.5cm x 25.5cm x.25cm (closed); 50cm wide x 25cm tall (open)

These nine Maori women were photographed in the late 1800’s by Elizabeth Pulman, New Zealand’s first known woman photographer.

The English-born mother of nine ran a photographic studio in Auckland and was respected by the local tribes. Her photos show Maori people from all walks of life. An album of her glass plate prints, treasured by my family for generations, is now in the Auckland Museum. Inspired by the words of Jean Shinoda Bolen, I have arranged photos of nine Maori portraits in a ‘creative circle’. My intention in making this book is to acknowledge these women, to bring them out of that musty album and give them a place in the world and the light.

Elizabeth Pulman (1836-1900) was born in England and sailed for New Zealand in 1861. Twice widowed, she raised nine children on her own and campaigned vigorously for copyright protection for map makers and photographers. Records show she held a deep respect for the Maori people and their culture.

Marama Warren, MIlton, Australia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Mycorrhizae ” by Jillian Sico

“Mycorrhizae ” by Jillian Sico

Letterpress on handmade paper including linen/flax with charcoal, tree-retted linen paper, flax, Alabama kozo, andrecycled paper with chanterelle mushroom spores

5.5 x 10.25″ (closed); 32.4″ (Fully open accordion – flat)

Mycorrhizae explores connectivity and loss from a personal and ecological perspective through an examination of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae are underground, necessary symbiotic associations between fungi and plant roots that facilitate nutrient and information exchange among and between plant species. Throughout the course of this project, personal reflections became intertwined with research about the hidden, underground landscape of my research site, the Cohutta Wilderness in the mountains of North Georgia. I used papermaking as a performative medium to tie the book materially to a specific place and time. The sound and texture of handmade paper, along with personal and scientific reflections, recreate for the reader the experience of genuine connection with the forest.

Mycorrhizae is a collaboration between myself and ecologist Katie Beidler, who wrote the text for the informational pamphlet.

Jillian Sico, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Mycorrhizae ” by Jillian Sico

Letterpress on handmade paper including linen/flax with charcoal, tree-retted linen paper, flax, Alabama kozo, andrecycled paper with chanterelle mushroom spores

5.5 x 10.25″ (closed); 32.4″ (Fully open accordion – flat)

Mycorrhizae explores connectivity and loss from a personal and ecological perspective through an examination of mycorrhizae. Mycorrhizae are underground, necessary symbiotic associations between fungi and plant roots that facilitate nutrient and information exchange among and between plant species. Throughout the course of this project, personal reflections became intertwined with research about the hidden, underground landscape of my research site, the Cohutta Wilderness in the mountains of North Georgia. I used papermaking as a performative medium to tie the book materially to a specific place and time. The sound and texture of handmade paper, along with personal and scientific reflections, recreate for the reader the experience of genuine connection with the forest.

Mycorrhizae is a collaboration between myself and ecologist Katie Beidler, who wrote the text for the informational pamphlet.

Jillian Sico, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Gay and Lesbian Studies ” by Sarah Scarr

“Gay and Lesbian Studies ” by Sarah Scarr

Letterpress printing (relief, photopolymer, and pressure-printing)

10.25″x6.75″x.0.25″ (closed); 10.25″x13.25″ and 10.25″x 19.25″ (open)

Gay and Lesbian Studies is a smutty, indulgent, letterpress-printed escape into lesbian cinephile culture housed in a millimeter binding. In the central text, an unnamed instructor of creative writing explores the tension between her fetish for the coded eroticism of the lesbian film canon and her out and proud existence. In the margins, we become privy to the narrator’s references and how representations of lesbianism in art guide her interpretations of the world around her and fold-out imagery reveal the eroticism of her inner thoughts.

Gay and Lesbian Studies was developed as a collaboration between author Sophie Strohmeier, and Two Trick Pony Press & Bindery. The letterpress printed cover paper hides a lesbian liaison in a traditional pattern, while bits of lime goatskin peek out at head and tail, capturing the central tension of the text within: the allure of secretive sexuality vs a fully out existence enabled by the burgeoning acceptance of LGBTQIA+ identities.

Sarah Scarr, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Gay and Lesbian Studies ” by Sarah Scarr

Letterpress printing (relief, photopolymer, and pressure-printing)

10.25″x6.75″x.0.25″ (closed); 10.25″x13.25″ and 10.25″x 19.25″ (open)

Gay and Lesbian Studies is a smutty, indulgent, letterpress-printed escape into lesbian cinephile culture housed in a millimeter binding. In the central text, an unnamed instructor of creative writing explores the tension between her fetish for the coded eroticism of the lesbian film canon and her out and proud existence. In the margins, we become privy to the narrator’s references and how representations of lesbianism in art guide her interpretations of the world around her and fold-out imagery reveal the eroticism of her inner thoughts.

Gay and Lesbian Studies was developed as a collaboration between author Sophie Strohmeier, and Two Trick Pony Press & Bindery. The letterpress printed cover paper hides a lesbian liaison in a traditional pattern, while bits of lime goatskin peek out at head and tail, capturing the central tension of the text within: the allure of secretive sexuality vs a fully out existence enabled by the burgeoning acceptance of LGBTQIA+ identities.

Sarah Scarr, Tuscaloosa, Alabama

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Sentinels of the Desert” by Laura Russell

“Sentinels of the Desert” by Laura Russell

Limited Edition Artist Book. Hedi Kyle’s Panorama book structure. Archival pigment prints on Mohawk Superfine paper.

8″ x 4″ x .75″ (closed); accordion extends out to 32 inches.

Saguaro cactus, a majestic symbol of the Sonoran Desert, are endangered by climate change, drought and competing invasive plant species. They form the foundation of an interdependent ecosystem that would be forever lost if conditions continue to decline.

This limited-edition artist book uses Hedi Kyle’s Panorama structure to show two stories of these beloved desert icons. The first side is a visual timeline of the life of the Saguaro, which has an average life span of 150-175 years and can grow as high as a four-story building. Original photos document the cactus from delicate seeds, to monumental maturity, and then decay and death leaving behind a ribbed wooden skeleton.

The second side features a poem written by the artist, celebrating the majesty and cultural touchstone that is this vital species and worrying over the most serious threats to the Saguaro, and indeed, the desert’s survival.

Laura Russell, Portland, Organ

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Sentinels of the Desert” by Laura Russell

Limited Edition Artist Book. Hedi Kyle’s Panorama book structure. Archival pigment prints on Mohawk Superfine paper.

8″ x 4″ x .75″ (closed); accordion extends out to 32 inches.

Saguaro cactus, a majestic symbol of the Sonoran Desert, are endangered by climate change, drought and competing invasive plant species. They form the foundation of an interdependent ecosystem that would be forever lost if conditions continue to decline.

This limited-edition artist book uses Hedi Kyle’s Panorama structure to show two stories of these beloved desert icons. The first side is a visual timeline of the life of the Saguaro, which has an average life span of 150-175 years and can grow as high as a four-story building. Original photos document the cactus from delicate seeds, to monumental maturity, and then decay and death leaving behind a ribbed wooden skeleton.

The second side features a poem written by the artist, celebrating the majesty and cultural touchstone that is this vital species and worrying over the most serious threats to the Saguaro, and indeed, the desert’s survival.

Laura Russell, Portland, Organ

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Go Inside” by Sara Quinn

“Go Inside” by Sara Quinn

Silkscreen, Letterpress with hand set type and polymer plates, two part binding with drum leaf and fold out accordion

9.25″ x 5.625″ x .875″ (closed)

Go Inside is an unlearning book for kids and grown-ups. This book draws on the artist’s ongoing reckoning with her role as a white teacher within harmful systems: striving to craft narratives that allow listeners to be themselves, and simultaneously doing her own internal work. A playful two-part binding and richly textured connected imagery invite the reader to explore the source of their inherent value and self-knowledge.

Sara Quinn, Atlanta, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Go Inside” by Sara Quinn

Silkscreen, Letterpress with hand set type and polymer plates, two part binding with drum leaf and fold out accordion

9.25″ x 5.625″ x .875″ (closed)

Go Inside is an unlearning book for kids and grown-ups. This book draws on the artist’s ongoing reckoning with her role as a white teacher within harmful systems: striving to craft narratives that allow listeners to be themselves, and simultaneously doing her own internal work. A playful two-part binding and richly textured connected imagery invite the reader to explore the source of their inherent value and self-knowledge.

Sara Quinn, Atlanta, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Breath Series: Anatomical Flap Book” by Marianne Petit

“Breath Series: Anatomical Flap Book” by Marianne Petit

Pop-Up Anatomical Flap Book

18″ x 19″ x .5″

Marianne R. Petit is an artist and educator whose work explores fairy tales, anatomical obsessions, graphic and narrative medicine, as well as collective storytelling practices through mechanical books that combine animation and papercraft. Her interests are in combining technology, traditional book arts, and sequential storytelling to create new forms of narrative for the 21st century. Petit’s artwork has appeared internationally in festivals and exhibitions, been featured in publications such as Hyperallergic, Make, and Wired, and broadcast on IFC and PBS. Her movable books can be found in numerous museum and library collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the British Library, the Berlin Public Library, Boston Library, as well as numerous University and private collections.

“Breath: Anatomical FlapBook” was created in response to several weeks of poor air quality while living in Shanghai, China, I began a series of studies on respiration.

Marianne Petit, New York, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Breath Series: Anatomical Flap Book” by Marianne Petit

Pop-Up Anatomical Flap Book

18″ x 19″ x .5″

Marianne R. Petit is an artist and educator whose work explores fairy tales, anatomical obsessions, graphic and narrative medicine, as well as collective storytelling practices through mechanical books that combine animation and papercraft. Her interests are in combining technology, traditional book arts, and sequential storytelling to create new forms of narrative for the 21st century. Petit’s artwork has appeared internationally in festivals and exhibitions, been featured in publications such as Hyperallergic, Make, and Wired, and broadcast on IFC and PBS. Her movable books can be found in numerous museum and library collections including the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, the British Library, the Berlin Public Library, Boston Library, as well as numerous University and private collections.

“Breath: Anatomical FlapBook” was created in response to several weeks of poor air quality while living in Shanghai, China, I began a series of studies on respiration.

Marianne Petit, New York, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“9 Witches” by Dawn Peterson

“9 Witches” by Dawn Peterson

Bookboard, letterpress, bookcloth, lead type

8.5″ x 6″ x 2.25″

The symbolic number 9 in my artist book represents the enigmatic term of witches and geometry. The base of my artist book is a 3d printed brass vessel; similar to a metal cauldron that will age over time. The 9 geometric columns represent the mysteries of the number 9 and the book pages are from the Larousse World Mythology book published in 1971.

The book pages are from a book that writes about mythology from all over the world. Inside the vessel is an Emily Dickinson poem about surreptitiousness of geometry and how what may seem like ordinary acts are magical deeds that express the love of the world.

The 9 geometric columns symbolically hold the pages and knowledge of the world. My work has been published in 500 Handmade Books, Hand Papermaking, American Artist, 23 Sandy and featured on various websites. My work is in public and private collections such a college and university libraries and in private companies and individuals.

Dawn Peterson, Tybee Island, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“9 Witches” by Dawn Peterson

Bookboard, letterpress, bookcloth, lead type

8.5″ x 6″ x 2.25″

The symbolic number 9 in my artist book represents the enigmatic term of witches and geometry. The base of my artist book is a 3d printed brass vessel; similar to a metal cauldron that will age over time. The 9 geometric columns represent the mysteries of the number 9 and the book pages are from the Larousse World Mythology book published in 1971.

The book pages are from a book that writes about mythology from all over the world. Inside the vessel is an Emily Dickinson poem about surreptitiousness of geometry and how what may seem like ordinary acts are magical deeds that express the love of the world.

The 9 geometric columns symbolically hold the pages and knowledge of the world. My work has been published in 500 Handmade Books, Hand Papermaking, American Artist, 23 Sandy and featured on various websites. My work is in public and private collections such a college and university libraries and in private companies and individuals.

Dawn Peterson, Tybee Island, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Weight of Words” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

“Weight of Words” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

Bookboard, letterpress, bookcloth, lead type

8.5″ x 6″ x 2.25″

Stefanie Papaiacovou is a multimedia artist who explores the power of materials, space, time and interaction to tell personal narratives. Stefanie uses her own stories, as well as the experiences of others to navigate concepts of identity and the self, questioning the ways we define ourselves, and how those very definitions are shaped and changed by experience, relationships, trauma and the world we live in. Stefanie draws inspiration from the natural world, and uses the imagery and colors of the landscapes we inhabit to create works that are grounded and somber. Drawing from her background in printmaking, sculpture, and book art she creates a wide range of work that incorporates haptic sensations and considers the emotional connotations, cultural histories, and physicality of her materials. Her work speaks to viewers on an individual basis, allowing them to have conversations that lead them to explore their own personal experiences and connections.

Stefanie Papaiacovou, Oakland, California

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Weight of Words” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

Bookboard, letterpress, bookcloth, lead type

8.5″ x 6″ x 2.25″

Stefanie Papaiacovou is a multimedia artist who explores the power of materials, space, time and interaction to tell personal narratives. Stefanie uses her own stories, as well as the experiences of others to navigate concepts of identity and the self, questioning the ways we define ourselves, and how those very definitions are shaped and changed by experience, relationships, trauma and the world we live in. Stefanie draws inspiration from the natural world, and uses the imagery and colors of the landscapes we inhabit to create works that are grounded and somber. Drawing from her background in printmaking, sculpture, and book art she creates a wide range of work that incorporates haptic sensations and considers the emotional connotations, cultural histories, and physicality of her materials. Her work speaks to viewers on an individual basis, allowing them to have conversations that lead them to explore their own personal experiences and connections.

Stefanie Papaiacovou, Oakland, California

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“A Current Shape” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

“A Current Shape” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

Letterpress, epoxy resin

10.5″ x 27.5″ x 3″

Stefanie Papaiacovou is a multimedia artist who explores the power of materials, space, time and interaction to tell personal narratives. Stefanie uses her own stories, as well as the experiences of others to navigate concepts of identity and the self, questioning the ways we define ourselves, and how those very definitions are shaped and changed by experience, relationships, trauma and the world we live in. Stefanie draws inspiration from the natural world, and uses the imagery and colors of the landscapes we inhabit to create works that are grounded and somber. Drawing from her background in printmaking, sculpture, and book art she creates a wide range of work that incorporates haptic sensations and considers the emotional connotations, cultural histories, and physicality of her materials. Her work speaks to viewers on an individual basis, allowing them to have conversations that lead them to explore their own personal experiences and connections.

Stefanie Papaiacovou, Oakland, California

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“A Current Shape” by Stefanie Papaiacovou

Letterpress, epoxy resin

10.5″ x 27.5″ x 3″

Stefanie Papaiacovou is a multimedia artist who explores the power of materials, space, time and interaction to tell personal narratives. Stefanie uses her own stories, as well as the experiences of others to navigate concepts of identity and the self, questioning the ways we define ourselves, and how those very definitions are shaped and changed by experience, relationships, trauma and the world we live in. Stefanie draws inspiration from the natural world, and uses the imagery and colors of the landscapes we inhabit to create works that are grounded and somber. Drawing from her background in printmaking, sculpture, and book art she creates a wide range of work that incorporates haptic sensations and considers the emotional connotations, cultural histories, and physicality of her materials. Her work speaks to viewers on an individual basis, allowing them to have conversations that lead them to explore their own personal experiences and connections.

Stefanie Papaiacovou, Oakland, California

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Difficult Loves (Amores Difciles)” by Kathleen OConnell

“Difficult Loves (Amores Difciles)” by Kathleen OConnell

Ink jet print on paper; hardcover, accordion bound book

13″ x 9.5″ x .5″

Difficult Loves (Amores Difíciles) contains inkjet prints from digitally altered original gouache drawings. The larger, original drawings were made while reading, “In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex” by Nathaniel Philbrick. From the colophon: “Handlettered texts from shipwrecks, hopes + dreams. Loveletters from the Americas.”

Kathleen OConnell, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Difficult Loves (Amores Difciles)” by Kathleen OConnell

Ink jet print on paper; hardcover, accordion bound book

13″ x 9.5″ x .5″

Difficult Loves (Amores Difíciles) contains inkjet prints from digitally altered original gouache drawings. The larger, original drawings were made while reading, “In the Heart of the Sea: The Tragedy of the Whaleship Essex” by Nathaniel Philbrick. From the colophon: “Handlettered texts from shipwrecks, hopes + dreams. Loveletters from the Americas.”

Kathleen OConnell, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Inside/Outside” by Kathleen OConnell

“Inside/Outside” by Kathleen OConnell

Digital printing on Moab Entrada Rag paper

11″ x 4.25″ x .5″

I began “Inside/Outside” by thinking about “my place,” as both a built environment and as a metaphor (a woman’s place, to be put in one’s place, to know one’s place, etc.). At the same time, I began a bathroom remodel bringing in the expertise of a stranger (now intimate friend). We told each other stories. We talked in depth about how people perceive us as humans, as bodies, as embodiments; how we navigate those perceptions, inside and outside of our person, our home and our communities.

From the colophon: “Inspired by stories from two friends, and one in-depth conversation with a third, about how people perceive each other, and how we navigate those perceptions, both inside and outside of our person.”

Kathleen OConnell, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Inside/Outside” by Kathleen OConnell

Digital printing on Moab Entrada Rag paper

11″ x 4.25″ x .5″

I began “Inside/Outside” by thinking about “my place,” as both a built environment and as a metaphor (a woman’s place, to be put in one’s place, to know one’s place, etc.). At the same time, I began a bathroom remodel bringing in the expertise of a stranger (now intimate friend). We told each other stories. We talked in depth about how people perceive us as humans, as bodies, as embodiments; how we navigate those perceptions, inside and outside of our person, our home and our communities.

From the colophon: “Inspired by stories from two friends, and one in-depth conversation with a third, about how people perceive each other, and how we navigate those perceptions, both inside and outside of our person.”

Kathleen OConnell, Murfreesboro, Tennessee

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Brain Map” by Tracey Millard

“Brain Map” by Tracey Millard

Fibers, Beading, Books

10.5″ x 15″ x 2.5″

I have a passion for art. From a young age, I used crayons and scrap paper but quickly, I became my Mother’s assistant in cutting fabric to make clothing for us kids. I loved the feel of the textiles and was amazed at her ability to take a scrap of fabric and make something out of nothing. Muses include the Impressionists like Van Gogh and the realism of Georgia O’Keefe. I now realize I was drawn to their beautiful color palettes and even the texture of each brush stroke. In my multi-media pieces, I incorporate different materials to achieve a multitude of textures which I work to expose and also hide to be discovered later. Each piece begins after research and preliminary drawings, but once I begin actual “making” the material informs me, surprises me and draws me in new directions.

Brain Map is a beading exploration of the interconnected world from outside – the book – to inside – the brain which uses all lobes to translate, imagine and incorporate into our life view.

Tracey Millard, Savannah, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Brain Map” by Tracey Millard

Fibers, Beading, Books

10.5″ x 15″ x 2.5″

I have a passion for art. From a young age, I used crayons and scrap paper but quickly, I became my Mother’s assistant in cutting fabric to make clothing for us kids. I loved the feel of the textiles and was amazed at her ability to take a scrap of fabric and make something out of nothing. Muses include the Impressionists like Van Gogh and the realism of Georgia O’Keefe. I now realize I was drawn to their beautiful color palettes and even the texture of each brush stroke. In my multi-media pieces, I incorporate different materials to achieve a multitude of textures which I work to expose and also hide to be discovered later. Each piece begins after research and preliminary drawings, but once I begin actual “making” the material informs me, surprises me and draws me in new directions.

Brain Map is a beading exploration of the interconnected world from outside – the book – to inside – the brain which uses all lobes to translate, imagine and incorporate into our life view.

Tracey Millard, Savannah, Georgia

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Oscar Wilde: In Earnest and Out” by Emily Martin

“Oscar Wilde: In Earnest and Out” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

13″ x 9.25″ x 1.25″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Oscar Wilde: In Earnest and Out” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

13″ x 9.25″ x 1.25″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“the Tragedy of King Lear” by Emily Martin

“the Tragedy of King Lear” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

12″ x 6″ x .5″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“the Tragedy of King Lear” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

12″ x 6″ x .5″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Gertrude Has a Few Questions” by Emily Martin

“Gertrude Has a Few Questions” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

6.5″ x 8.5″ x .5″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Gertrude Has a Few Questions” by Emily Martin

Letterpress printing

6.5″ x 8.5″ x .5″

First and foremost, I am interested in telling the viewer a story. The story might be drawn from theater, social observations, current events, sometimes all of those things in the same story. I often use humor and I nearly always include interactive elements to further draw in the viewer, to bring attention to just what story it is that I am telling. I originally trained as a painter and I started making artists books while still in graduate school in the late 1970s. I am interested in the relationship between the viewer and the book. To view a book fully it must be handled, this makes for a more connected even intimate, type of viewing. To that end, I am very careful in my printing and construction, not only to honor the crafts that I use, but to make sure my books are sturdy and can withstand being out in the world. When constructing my stories, I consider what to include and what to leave to the viewer’s imagination or prior experience.

Emily Martin, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Reader in Botany” by Julie Leonard

“Reader in Botany” by Julie Leonard

Paper Binding: Handmade papers, Erasures & Plant Inclusions

15″ x 11″ x .75″

Recent work considers connections between textiles, paper, plants; quilting, and lace making, and concepts including nomenclature, nostalgia and memory. There is a looking back going on, and also, the thread that links our personal and collective memories to the present to what is to come-the intersections between how we live in the world and how we name things in that world-spines of books and bodies and plants and poems-our desire to name things seemingly in order to understand them. The activities that go into making the work from cooking fibers to forming sheets of paper, writing poems then embedded into those papers as a part of the forming, and, finally, making sense of them through binding or piecing. This series of handmade paper works are made from raw abaca and flax fibers, and family linens from my maternal ancestors. Composing the work as papers were formed is a process of surprise and unknowing as with placing a ceramic piece in the kiln waiting to see the final result.

Julie Leonard, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Reader in Botany” by Julie Leonard

Paper Binding: Handmade papers, Erasures & Plant Inclusions

15″ x 11″ x .75″

Recent work considers connections between textiles, paper, plants; quilting, and lace making, and concepts including nomenclature, nostalgia and memory. There is a looking back going on, and also, the thread that links our personal and collective memories to the present to what is to come-the intersections between how we live in the world and how we name things in that world-spines of books and bodies and plants and poems-our desire to name things seemingly in order to understand them. The activities that go into making the work from cooking fibers to forming sheets of paper, writing poems then embedded into those papers as a part of the forming, and, finally, making sense of them through binding or piecing. This series of handmade paper works are made from raw abaca and flax fibers, and family linens from my maternal ancestors. Composing the work as papers were formed is a process of surprise and unknowing as with placing a ceramic piece in the kiln waiting to see the final result.

Julie Leonard, Iowa City, Iowa

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“A’tugwaqan: Three Mi’kmaq Indian Stories” by Jim Lee

“A’tugwaqan: Three Mi’kmaq Indian Stories” by Jim Lee

Antique sad iron, scorched paper: pages by Hannah More 1791

3″ x 2″ x 2″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Jim Lee, Glastonbury, Connecticut

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“A’tugwaqan: Three Mi’kmaq Indian Stories” by Jim Lee

Antique sad iron, scorched paper: pages by Hannah More 1791

3″ x 2″ x 2″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Jim Lee, Glastonbury, Connecticut

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“PRESSING ON: Homage to Hannah More No. 106” by Carole Kunstadt

“PRESSING ON: Homage to Hannah More No. 106” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, scorched paper: pages by Hannah More 1791

3″ x 2″ x 2″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“PRESSING ON: Homage to Hannah More No. 106” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, scorched paper: pages by Hannah More 1791

3″ x 2″ x 2″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Pressing on No. 98” by Carole Kunstadt

“Pressing on No. 98” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, scorched thread, paper: pages by More 1791

5.5″ x 3.75″ x 5″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Pressing on No. 98” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, scorched thread, paper: pages by More 1791

5.5″ x 3.75″ x 5″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Pressing on No. 91” by Carole Kunstadt

“Pressing on No. 91” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, sandpaper, scorched pages :Hannah More 1791

5.5″ x 3.75″ x 5″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

“Pressing on No. 91” by Carole Kunstadt

Antique sad iron, sandpaper, scorched pages :Hannah More 1791

5.5″ x 3.75″ x 5″

PRESSING ON takes material and intellectual inspiration from Hannah More’s An Estimate of the Religion of the Fashionable World: By One of the Laity, London, 1791. Hannah More – published anonymously, it was one of the most widely read books of the day. Hannah More (1745 – 1833) was an abolitionist, social reformer, philanthropist, writer and feminist. Her writings strongly influenced the public mind and social character of her day. More’s life-long cause was galvanizing women to act not as domestic ornaments, but as thinking, engaged and responsible beings.

More helped give the abolition movement a public voice with her writings. Publishing and collaborating with William Wilberforce, an outspoken member of Parliament, she remained active in the anti-slavery movement her entire life. Dying in September of 1833, she lived just long enough to see slavery abolished in the British Empire. More’s convictions were moral, social and political, inspiring us to raise one’s voice to injustice.

Carole Kunstadt, West Hurley, New York

FOR PURCHASE INFORMATION, contact the Decatur Arts Alliance at 404-371-9583.

Past Exhibitions


2020 exhibition: Infinity

See it here.


2019 exhibition: Wonder

Click to see the catalog.

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